Displaying items by tag: james cropper paper

Thursday, 03 March 2016 10:32

Paper and Fashion unite on the catwalk

British master papermaker James Cropper recently teamed up with influential fashion designer Edeline Lee to deliver the paper for the set of her Autumn/Winter 2016 show at London Fashion Week.

The heritage paper manufacturer supplied beautiful and tactile papers for the scenography of the show, which took place on 19 February at The Vinyl Factory and marked the designer’s second collection to be exhibited at the prestigious event.

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Canadian-born, London-based Edeline has gained international recognition for her dynamic fashion presentations, which have the immersive quality of film and live performance. She has apprenticed in the studios of Alexander McQueen and John Galliano, and worked at Zac Posen in New York and Rodnik in London, where she was head designer. She counts celebrities Alicia Vikander, Taylor Swift and Solange Knowles among her fans.

Speaking of the collaboration with James Cropper, Edeline said: “Over the years, I’ve learnt how every detail counts when it comes to creating luxury, which is why I wanted the paper for this set to come from a like-minded brand for which quality is paramount. All my designs are made by hand in England, so James Cropper, as an innately British company with an impressive heritage, was a perfect match.”

A chequerboard pattern was created using paper from James Cropper’s ‘Black’ and ‘Ambassador’ ranges, while height was achieved with shaped mounds of predominantly white shredded paper interspersed with bright accents from ‘Vanguard’ colours. The colourful and playful abstract paper shapes created a landscape behind the models that was anchored by the powerful black and white base to the scheme.

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Susan Wilson, luxury packaging director at James Cropper, said: “There is, of course, a potent link between paper and fashion design. Being involved in this beautiful project maintains our public support for initiatives that champion creativity and, more specifically, how integral paper is to artistic processes. Edeline Lee continues to push boundaries with her designs and presentations and we’re proud to have come together for London Fashion Week. The show was magnificent!”

The artist behind the scenography was Kyung Roh Bannwart, who Edeline previously worked with on her Spring/Summer 2016 collection. She employs various media, including sculpture, sound light and objects, to build structure and create an emotional and physical experience.

The paper used for the presentation is destined to be recycled, aligned with James Cropper’s dedication to sustainability within the paper sector. The company has invested significantly in its plant and technology, to both develop its range of recycled materials and to ensure its own production methods are as sustainable as possible.

James Cropper supplies distinct, custom-made paper products to many of the world’s leading art galleries, designers and luxury brands – providing the paper for Selfridges’ signature yellow bags –  and is a proud sponsor of other artists and exhibitions, including events at NYCxDesign, YSL at The Bowes and the fabulous ‘Paper Bar’ at London’s ICA for Thomas Pink’s Autumn/Winter 2015 collection.

For more information about James Cropper, visit www.jamescropper.com.

Published in European News

British Master Papermaker, James Cropper, has successfully mimicked the luxurious look and feel of suede in paper form, creating a new generation of tactile luxury papers.  

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Craftsmanship, progress and an unequalled expertise with leather are the founding pillars of the luxury brand, LOEWE.  Recognising that craft, experience and innovation are also at the heart of papermaking excellence, the Spanish-based brand approached James Cropper to fashion a suede-effect paper for its product packaging.  LOEWE was looking to create statement packaging, that paired functionality with an incredible tactile softness, to emulate the look and feel of its world renowned range of leather goods. The result of the collaboration between the two companies, each with 170 years of business success, was Carvetian Suede.

Susan Wilson, Luxury Packaging Director, said: “We are always striving to create new and innovative papers to meet the demand for high quality, luxury products. Carvetian Suede offers people in the design and packaging industries something that exudes opulence. The product has great foundations, a base paper designed specifically to meld with the soft-touch surface to create a suede paper of the highest quality. In addition we use a high percentage of recycled fibres so it’s very eco-friendly, making it all the more appealing to our clients by helping them achieve their sustainability objectives.” 

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Following on from the success of the 2013 packaging launch for LOEWE, Carvetian Suede is now available to international buyers and presents an opportunity not only to create luxurious packaging but creative print and advertising materials with a wonderful tactile feel.

The product has been employed in a variety of uses since its inception. In 2013 a sculpture of a dog in a stylish Carvetian Suede coat was presented at the Gerald and James exhibition in New York.

From 21 – 23 October 2015, visitors to the prestigious Luxe Pack event at the Grimaldi Forum in Monaco will also have the opportunity to discover Carvetian Suede for themselves.  The product has been selected for display in the Luxe Pack Arena, a space dedicated for leading product developments, and can also be found on the James Cropper stand, DB9.

Carvetian Suede is produced using a minimum of 40 per cent recycled, post consumer fibres making it an environmentally-friendly choice.

Available in a range of four natural colours, Carvetian Suede takes its name from the Carvetii, Iron Age settlers in the North of England, reflecting the roots of James Cropper’s heritage. 

ABOUT JAMES CROPPER & TECHNICAL FIBRE PRODUCTS (TFP):

James Cropper are prestige paper innovators based in the English Lake District, supplying distinct, custom-made paper products to many of the world’s leading luxury brands, art galleries and designers. Celebrating 170 years of high quality paper production in 2015, the business has been carefully stewarded and nurtured by six generations of the Cropper family and is renowned globally for individual expertise in colour, dedicated responses to the most challenging custom projects and award-winning commitment to the highest standards of sustainability.

A network of global sales and production facilities from Europe to the Far East provides local customer service to international clients, while its historic base in the village of Burneside retains nearly two centuries worth of papermaking expertise.

As well as paper products, James Cropper PLC also incorporates Technical Fibre Products (TFP), manufacturers of non-woven materials from carbon, glass and polymer fibres, which play a key part in production of composites in the automotive, energy and aerospace sectors. For further information visit: www.jamescropper.com  and www.tfpglobal.com

Published in European News
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Tuesday, 22 September 2015 10:15

YSL Exhibition Unfurled

Paper replaces walls in the innovative installation of landmark Style is Eternal show celebrating the work of fashion designer, Yves Saint Laurent.

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Where most exhibitions are constructed of wood panels and metal nails, part of the remarkable exhibition of Yves Saint Laurent’s work and life at The Bowes Museum, County Durham has been intricately dressed with paper. As if walking into the designer’s sketch books, a room designed by Paris’ agence NC, Nathalie Crinière has taken stock from British master papermakers, James Cropper Paper and formed an immersive, paper-based appreciation of Saint Laurent’s creative process.

Yves Saint Laurent: Style is Eternal, the first exhibition in the UK to show a comprehensive display of the French designer’s work is dominated by paper, from initial sketches to specification forms and the patterns for his famous final designs. Understanding that paper is riven through the creative process, Agence NC designer Nathalie Crinière and installation company, North Exhibition Services set about to ensure the natural look of paper was dominant as a backdrop to the exhibition experience. A white cube of pristine white paper cocoons a range of Saint Laurent’s earliest creations in trademark monochrome fabrics, making good use of The Bowes Museum’s high ceilings with a dramatic drop of uninterrupted, five to six metre sheets.

Unaware as to how the paper would respond directly from rolls, or precisely how to match paper elements with other parts in glass and steel, the versatility of the stock soon became an advantage as complex cuts were made with only blades and scissors. The sense of understatement is emboldened by the texture of the 120gsm paper, which curls naturally at the foot of each hung sheet, evoking the gnarled edges of a well-worn notebook or the flick of a lavish evening dress. A slight movement in the paper as large numbers of visitors pass through the space adds an unexpected, sensuous sense of animation.

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Specialists in black papers, James Cropper supplied a deep natural black paper in 120gsm to carry white text as information panels to guide viewers through the chronology of Saint Laurent’s career, instead of more standard exhibition installations that see vinyl lettering applied directly to walls or foamboard mounts. The effect is striking, yet in keeping with the exhibition’s understated style.

Doug Lamond, Founding Director of North Exhibition Services, said: “This was a first for us being asked to use paper to create the backdrop for an exhibition on this scale. It was a challenge in the sense that it was an unknown how the paper would behave straight off a roll. We needn’t have been worried as the paper worked very well as a backdrop for the show for many reasons, including its natural texture, weight and starkness of the white print on black. I would certainly recommend it as a finish whenever the aesthetic calls for it and on the scale we have just delivered, it has a great impact while being understated and subtle.”

James Cropper Paper, which supplies many of the world’s leading luxury brands with custom papers for their packaging requirements, also featured in the VIP launch invitation (Vanguard White, 620gsm and envelope in Vanguard Dark Grey), promotional print materials for the exhibition (Vanguard Silver Grey, 160gsm) and within the pages of the stunning 120 page catalogue (Vanguard Silver Grey, 120gsm and Vanguard Silver Grey, 300gsm), resplendent in a foiled and embossed cover and hand-finished binding.

Yves Saint Laurent: Style is Eternal, presented by The Bowes Museum and the Fondation Pierre Bergé - Yves Saint Laurent runs at The Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle, Teesdale, County Durham until Sunday 25 October 2015.

ABOUT JAMES CROPPER & TECHNICAL FIBRE PRODUCTS (TFP):

James Cropper are prestige paper innovators based in the English Lake District, supplying distinct, custom-made paper products to many of the world’s leading luxury brands, art galleries and designers. A proud sponsor of artists and exhibitions including events at Frieze Masters and NYCxDesign, James Cropper Paper is committed to supporting creativity. Celebrating 170 years of high quality paper production in 2015, the business has been carefully stewarded and nurtured by six generations of the Cropper family and is renowned globally for individual expertise in colour, dedicated responses to the most challenging custom projects and award-winning commitment to the highest standards of sustainability.

A network of global sales and production facilities from Europe to the Far East provides local customer service to international clients, while its historic base in the village of Burneside retains nearly two centuries worth of paper making expertise.

In supporting Yves Saint Laurent: Style Is Eternal, James Cropper reflects on the strong link between paper and design, with Saint Laurent himself expressing early creativity in the meticulous execution of handcrafted paper dolls. The company’s paper plays a role as a backdrop to the exhibition itself with small reels of white paper, specially cut to length, hanging in the ‘Glass Cube’ and reels of a black board printed to create a timeline along the entire length of the gallery. Uncoated papers in classic white and grey shades from the Vanguard collection feature as VIP invitations, sections within the Yves Saint Laurent book and also the exhibition guide.

As well as paper products, James Cropper PLC also incorporates Technical Fibre Products (TFP), manufacturers of non-woven materials from carbon, glass and polymer fibres, which play a key part in production of composites in the automotive, energy and aerospace sectors. For further information visit: www.jamescropper.com and www.tfpglobal.com

About the Fondation Pierre Bergé - Yves Saint Laurent

The Fondation Pierre Bergé - Yves Saint Laurent, which opened in 2004 in the former Yves Saint Laurent couture house on 5 Avenue Marceau, Paris, is founded on 40 years of creativity. Recognised as a public organisation, it has three missions:

  • The rigorous museological conservation of a unique heritage comprising five thousand haute couture garments and fifteen thousand accessories, as well as thousands of sketches, collection boards, photographs, and objects;
  • The organization of exhibitions, in both the refurbished spaces at 5 Avenue Marceau and museums around the world, promoting Yves Saint Laurent’s work.
  • The support of cultural institutions encouraging the contemporary arts.

About The Bowes Museum

The Bowes Museum was created over 100 years ago by John and Joséphine Bowes.  Together they built up the greatest private collection of European fine and decorative arts in the North of England and constructed a magnificent French chateau in 17th century style, to house them in. The collection contains thousands of predominantly French objects including furniture, paintings, sculpture, ceramics, textiles and many other items covering an extensive range of European styles and periods.

For much of their lives John and Joséphine Bowes lived in Paris. Josephine was formerly an actress and performed in theThéâtre des Variétés, which John Bowes subsequently purchased.

The Bowes Museum has an internationally renowned exhibition programme. Recent exhibitions have included Tim Walker: Dreamscapes; Henry Poole Founder of Savile Row; and Stephen Jones ‘From Georgiana to Boy George’.  Current exhibitions are ‘Birds of Paradise –

Plumes and Feathers in Fashion’ initiated by MoMu Fashion Museum, Antwerp, and ‘Julian Opie Collected Works’, which presents works by and inspirations for the contemporary artist.

The Bowes Museum is located in Barnard Castle, County Durham and is open daily from 10.00am – 5.00pm

www.thebowesmuseum.org.uk

About Yves Saint Laurent

Yves Saint Laurent was born on 1st August 1936 in Oran, Algeria, where he spent all his youth. In 1955, after a period at theChambre syndicale de la haute couture in Paris, he was introduced by Michel de Brunhoff, then director of ParisVogue, to Christian Dior, who immediately took him on as his assistant. When Dior died in 1957, Yves Saint Laurent became artistic director of the House of Dior. His first collection, the «Trapèze» collection, presented in January 1958, was an immense success. Called up to do his military service and hospitalised at the Val de Grâce, he was dismissed by the House of Dior in 1960.

In association with Pierre Bergé, whom he had met in 1958, Yves Saint Laurent decided to create his own couture house and his first collection was presented on 29th January 1962 at 30 bis rue Spontini in Paris. They remained there for 12 years during which Yves Saint Laurent invented the modern woman’s wardrobe.

From the end of the 1950s and throughout his career Yves Saint Laurent created costumes for theatre, ballet and cinema. He collaborated with Roland Petit, Claude Régy, Jean-Louis Barrault, Luis Buñuel, François Truffaut... and dressed Jean Marais, Zizi Jeanmaire, Arletty, Jeanne Moreau, Isabelle Adjani and Catherine Deneuve, who became a long-standing close friend.

As early as 1965 Yves Saint Laurent paid tribute to artists in his haute couture collections with the famous Mondrian dresses, then in 1966 with the pop art dresses and in 1967 with his major homage to African primitive art. Yves Saint Laurent would travel to Marrakech for a fortnight on 1st December and 1st June of each year in order to design his haute couture collections. Morocco, a country he discovered in 1966, was to have a major influence on his work and his colours, as did all his  travels: Japan, India, Russia, China and Spain all provided sources of inspiration for his collections. In 1974, Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé moved the couture house to 5, avenue Marceau in Paris, where the former would assert his style.

In 1983 the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted a retrospective exhibition to the couturier “Yves Saint Laurent 25 years of design”. It was the first time that a living fashion designer had received such an accolade there. Large-scale exhibitions were subsequently held in Beijing, Moscow, Tokyo and, of course, Paris, at the Musée des Arts de la mode, in 1986.

In 1998 Yves Saint Laurent dressed 300 models who appeared on the pitch of the Stade de France for the final match of the FIFA World Cup.

On 7th January 2002 he announced at a press conference that he was ending his career. On 22nd January of the same year, at the Centre Georges Pompidou, a retrospective show went back over 40 years of creation with over 300 models including his last Spring-Summer 2002 collection.

On 10th March 2004, the Fondation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent opened to the public with an exhibition entitled Yves Saint Laurent -Dialogue avec l’Art, which then travelled to the Caixa Galicia Foundation in Spain in 2007. The Yves Saint Laurent Style exhibition was presented in 2008 at the Fine Arts Museum of Montreal, and then at San Francisco’s de Young Museum.

On 1st June 2008, Yves Saint Laurent passed away at his Paris home in his seventy second year.

In 2010, the Fondation organised a major retrospective of Yves Saint Laurent’s work at the Petit Palais in Paris, which travelled to the MAPFRE Foundation in Madrid (2011) and the Denver Art Museum (2012). In 2013, a new exhibition project, Yves Saint Laurent, a visionary, was presented at the ING Cultural Center in Brussels.

Published in European News
Wednesday, 16 September 2015 09:44

170 Papers for 170 Years

James Cropper Paper shows at Luxury Packaging to celebrate a landmark anniversary with the paper and packaging industry.

A wall of paper will greet visitors to the James Cropper Paper stand at this year’s Luxury Packaging event, taking place on Wed 16 – Thu 17 September 2015 at Olympia, London. With 170 die-cut samples available to take away in myriad colours and finishes to mark the British Master Papermaker’s 170 years in business at their Lake District mill.

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As future-facing as ever, the company will also use the event as the opportunity to inspire visitors with a unique world of individual and distinct papers for packaging.   The business focus is on premium and uncoated papermaking that is unrivalled in terms of quality, versatility, sustainability and service.

The wall of coloured paper that provides a dramatic backdrop to the exhibition stand and anniversary celebrations will be made of hundreds of die cut samples, presented in a hexagonal shape that symbolises six generations of the Cropper family at the helm of the company, which was established in the Lake District in 1845. 

Chris Brown, Commercial Director of James Cropper PLC, said: “170 years of paper making in our historic home has meant overcoming the challenges of war, economic instability and increased global competition, as well as anticipating the opportunities found in new technologies. We have been ahead of those changes and had the chance to enhance sustainability, efficiency and innovation to become the successful company we are today. We are proud to celebrate 170 years with business partners and friends during Luxury Packaging 2015 and share with them our next wave of high-quality products.”

In addition, James Cropper Paper will introduce two new papers specifically designed to enrich the broadest possible range of printing outcomes - Porcelain, a pure white product that provides the crispest and smoothest of blank canvases for designers and Elation, a high-grade and versatile felt-marked paper available in 8 classic colours. Existing ranges, Comet with its shimmering pearlescent finish and the pastel tones of Lorenzo parchment will also be present at Luxury Packaging Innovations in new variants.

About Technical Fibre Products and James Cropper plc:

About Technical Fibre Products:

Technical Fibre Products (TFP) is a leading nonwoven manufacturer, offering a broad choice of high quality, technically advanced nonwovens for an array of challenging applications across industries ranging from aerospace and defence to automotive, energy, industrial, construction and healthcare. TFP is part of James Cropper plc and continues the group's 169 year tradition of building highly effective collaborative relationships with customers, enabling the development of custom material solutions to meet unique performance, process and aesthetic requirements.

About James Cropper plc:

James Cropper is based in the Lake District, England’s foremost National Park, with a paper-making heritage that started in 1845. Since its inception the business has been carefully stewarded and nurtured by six generations of the Cropper family.

Today the business is renowned globally for its luxury packaging papers, which accompany many of the world’s most exclusive brands, while the world’s leading artists, galleries and museums use its framing and archival boards alongside its range of conventional artists materials.  As well as paper products, James Cropper also manufactures nonwovens from carbon, glass and polymer fibres, which play a key part in production of composites in the automotive, energy and aerospace sectors.

To find out more about the innovative production methods, product range, responsible manufacturing principles and history of Technical Fibre Products and James Cropper, please visit www.tfpglobal.com and www.jamescropper.com.

Published in European News

A creative process often starts with a white piece of paper, sketched on and discarded. But, what happens when you ask a group of artists to make white paper the beginning, middle and end of a creative project? Redefining Paper, initiated by James Cropper Paper, challenged eight creatives to separately explore the potential of white paper, with surprising results.

In all, the white paper has remained pure, no more so than the minimalist, ‘unroll and hang’, customisable wall clock from Leeds-based duo, Rosanna and Clint,its simplicity being a willing and brilliant surrender to the understated grandeur of the material itself. The limits of the paper are pushed in the opposite direction by Manchester contemporary jeweller, Megan Ocheduszko, whose tight spinning of a length of paper forms a wearable necklace, alongside robust, durable rings. The responses say as much about the creative mind’s response to a stark, blank canvas, as it does about the resilience and versatility of the material at hand.

Supplied with a limited amount of Porcelain, a high-quality, smooth white paper made from virgin pulp by the British master papermakers, the hand-picked creatives were given freedom to explore its material properties. The only rules were to resist colouring the paper with dyes and avoid degrading it, such as by soaking in liquid.  By early-summer this year, the creatives had returned with the results, showing that the simplest ideas can do most justice to the simplest of materials.

Manchester’s rising architectural protégé, James Donegan brings digital brilliance and a steady hand with his modular sculpture of hundreds of separate, unglued components. A contemporary paper pendant lampshade from London’s Laura Nelson uses incisions more often found in metal work to subtly alter the paper in unforeseen ways. From Daniel Reed’s ethereal soundscape to Daniel Hoolahan’s laboriously cut, layered vase made from over 400 individual paper rings to Thomas Mills’ ceiling sculpture and James Condon’s mesmerising animation, the ideas and executions have demonstrated that there remains much inspiration to be found in white paper.

Chris Brown, Commercial Director for James Cropper Paper, says: “We overlook the versatility of white paper at our peril; it’s the ultimate blank canvas. In engaging with creative collaborators to work with one of our most versatile and immaculate papers, Porcelain, our intention was to prove that you can achieve previously unthinkable results with something so often taken for granted. The results speak for themselves, summing up our collective appreciation for the potential of an agile, creative mind and a simple sheet of white paper.”

Redefining Paper has been initiated as part of James Cropper Paper’s ongoing support for leading creative talent, which has included Steve Messam’s PaperBridge, a bridge made entirely of paper spanning a Lake District river earlier in 2015, and the internationally-renowned Gerald Exhibition at NYC x Design in 2012. Each of the creatives will be in line for selection as a standout ‘Chairman’s Choice’ piece by James Cropper’s sixth generation Chairman, Mark Cropper, and considered for further collaborations with the British manufacturer.

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James Donegan, Architect

Helix

Digitally designed and hand built, Helix is a prototype of a sculptural form designed to fill gallery spaces. The modular construction involves hundreds of laser etched components, held together by intricate, precise interlocking cuts.

James says: “The process of making paper involves taking a highly structured, organic material and reducing it to a two dimensional blank space upon which one can easily express one’s ideas. The project realises this complexity and attempts to return the structural properties of the material from which it was derived. Through the uses of parametric design and digital manufacturing techniques the structure has been created without the use of any other material, fixings or adhesives.”

Dan Hoolahan, Product Designer

www.danhoolahan.co.uk

2015 09 16 093511Porcelain Vase

Subtly colouring the paper through the heat of laser cutting, Hoolahan stretches the brief at the same time as directly referencing the name of the paper, Porcelain, in the form of a vase made of hundreds of glued rings.

Dan says: “I immediately wanted my piece to reflect the name of the paper range, Porcelain. Porcelain being commonly associated with ceramics such as bowls and vases it felt natural to play on this theme. Using a laser cutter, my sheet of paper was cut into rings of varying sizes. 449 of these rings, including closed pieces for the base, were then glued together in no particular order to create a structure.”

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Laura Nelson, Product Designer

www.lauranelson.co.uk

Burneside Shade

Seemingly effortless, yet painstakingly crafted, Nelson has created a highly desirable shade that, in any other material, would appear industrial and cold, yet in paper appears serene as light diffuses through its precise lines and clean cuts.

Laura says: “The Burneside Shade exploits the durability and structural properties of the paper through three-dimensional design. I have chosen a lampshade, as it demonstrates structural properties of the paper and manipulates light in different ways through simple cutting and folding techniques. Two lampshades can be produced from one sheet of 640mm x 900mm paper.”

Rosanna and Clint, Designers

www.rosannaandclint.com

2015 09 16 093455Kairos

A product of show-stopping potential as a mass-marketable household item or corporate gift. The paper has barely changed save for a few strategic cuts, all made by hand for prototyping, and yet the raw material has been transformed. Kairos remains a piece of paper as pure as the moment it was made, living a double life as an irrepressibly stylish and customisable home or office accessory.

Rosanna says:Our initial interpretation of the brief was the importance for the paper’s original characteristics to remain in the finished piece, aiming to do only what was necessary to transform the single sheet of paper. After some exploration and experimentation we liked the idea of creating a timepiece. The opportunity to create an object with such functional purpose is something that excites us in the studio.”

The full range of works included in Redefining Paper can be seen at www.redefiningpaper.com and information about James Cropper Paper at www.jamescropperpaper.com

ABOUT JAMES CROPPER & TECHNICAL FIBRE PRODUCTS (TFP):

James Cropper are prestige paper innovators based in the English Lake District, supplying distinct, custom-made paper products to many of the world’s leading luxury brands, art galleries and designers. A proud sponsor of artists and exhibitions including events at Frieze Masters and NYCxDesign, James Cropper Paper is committed to supporting creativity. Celebrating 170 years of high quality paper production in 2015, the business has been carefully stewarded and nurtured by six generations of the Cropper family and is renowned globally for individual expertise in colour, dedicated responses to the most challenging custom projects and award-winning commitment to the highest standards of sustainability.

A network of global sales and production facilities from Europe to the Far East provides local customer service to international clients, while its historic base in the village of Burneside retains nearly two centuries worth of paper making expertise.

As well as paper products, James Cropper PLC also incorporates Technical Fibre Products (TFP), manufacturers of non-woven materials from carbon, glass and polymer fibres, which play a key part in production of composites in the automotive, energy and aerospace sectors. For further information visit: www.jamescropper.com and www.tfpglobal.com

Published in European News

A stark vision in red, set against the verdant greens of the Helvellyn peak in the Lake District, a bridge made entirely from paper takes its place in the British countryside to defy both belief and gravity.

20,000 sheets of poppy red paper and 4 tonnes of stone drawn from the river bed are all that environmental artist; Steve Messam is using to create PaperBridge, a stunning intervention into one of Britain’s most dramatic landscapes.  This remarkable, weight-bearing paper bridge, resplendent in red, will straddle a flowing waterway in the beautiful Lake District as part of Lakes Ignite from Friday 8 May 2015.

PaperBridge Cumbria Lo1

Using traditional stone bridge building methods, starting with stone-filled cages to root the structure to the ground at either side of the river, before using an innovative wooden form to shape the arc of the paper, Messam uses no adhesives or fixings to keep the paper in place. The design of the form comes courtesy of Peter Foskett, formerly of the renowned Pentagram design agency, who has designed it to be raised fractionally towards the end of the construction to ensure a smooth, compact arch as the final sheets of paper are inserted.

Supplied by one of Britain’s oldest and locally based paper manufacturers, James Cropper, the paper is more commonly found in packaging for luxury brands than in the construction of all-weather, rural bridges. The challenge of ensuring it stands up to all elements, from the weather to curious animals, has not been lost on the artist, who has been careful to ensure that the environmental impact of the installation is close to zero, by selecting colour-fast papers and using stone found only on or near to the site itself.

Steve Messam says: “PaperBridge relies on vernacular architectural principles as used in the drystone walls and the original pack-horse bridges that dot the Lake District, using gravity and the pressure between the sheets of paper to form a strong structure. These have stood, in many cases, for more than a century so the principles of its design ensure it is strong enough to take the weight of people and local livestock if they become curious. None of the red colour will run into the water or surrounding earth and the paper will comfortably stand up to expected weather conditions.”

Anticipated to confuse and delight walkers who encounter it for around ten days, the installation is one of a series of temporary cultural installations set to appear in the Lake District National Park through 2015, commissioned by Lakes Culture. Sited at a stream above Patterdale in Cumbria, the location is deliberately remote, ensuring that visitors can enjoy it in peace and consider the contrast of the construction to the unspoilt, natural setting.

Usha Mistry, Project Manager for Lakes Culture, says:‘’PaperBridge is a unique large-scale temporary installation made entirely from bright red paper traversing a flowing river in the iconic Lake District landscape as part of ‘Lakes Ignite’, Lakes Culture’s showcase spring arts programme. As part of the programme Lakes Culture, working alongside some of the region’s key arts organisations, has commissioned a number of unique art pieces: Harmonica Botanica, Point To Point, Take Me Back to Manchester film, as well as PaperBridge. This is part of a pro-active project that demonstrates how this unique area has resonated with artists in the past and continues to inspire makers and performers working across a vast array of art forms, firmly emphasising the Lake District’s important role within the UK’s rich cultural life.’’

The PaperBridge concept has been in development for a number of years, but the organisation of the paper sheets to form the bridge takes just a matter of hours once initial onsite preparations have been made. A short period of testing makes the bridge sound for intrepid visitors to take their first steps over a river on nothing but paper. Once the installation has come to its end, the paper will return to James Cropper Paper in nearby Burneside, Kendal for recycling.

Chris Brown, Commercial Director for James Cropper Paper comments: “Paper has so many surprising qualities and uses, but PaperBridge takes the sheer weight of our product and lets nature do the rest. It’s a brilliantly simple idea that takes real ingenuity to pull off, so all credit to the artist in achieving what appears to be the impossible. The choice of colour, a stark red that won’t run into the water beneath, is an inspired choice and we’re very pleased that the paper will return to us to be recycled to support inspirational projects for other artists or designers.”

To find out more about art and culture in the Lake District, Cumbria or about ‘Lakes Ignite’ please visit www.lakesculture.co.uk and https://twitter.com/LakesCulture

To find out more about the work of the environmental artist, Steve Messam, and to follow project updates please visit www.stevemessam.co.uk/paperbridge and www.twitter.com/rougeit

To find out more about James Cropper Paper and the art and design projects they support, please visit: www.jamescropper.com

ABOUT LAKES CULTURE/LAKES IGNITE

  • Lakes Culture aims to bring together the area’s tourism and cultural sectors to better promote the wealth of cultural activities on offer reaffirming the area as the UK’s leading rural cultural destination.
  • The Lake District is one of only ten locations in the country to benefit from Cultural Destinations initiative a focused programme set up by Arts Council England and VisitEngland. The aim of Cultural destinations is to enable arts and culture organisations working in partnership with destination organisations to increase their reach, engagement and resilience through working with the tourism sector. Closer working between the two sectors will contribute to the economic growth of the cultural and tourism visitor economies.
  • Organisations involved in the project include Kendal Brewery Arts Centre (Lead Organisation), Lakeland Arts, Kendal Arts International, Wordsworth Trust, Theatre by the Lake, The Forestry Commission - Grizedale, Cumbria Tourism, The National Trust, Lake District National Park and South Lakeland District Council.
  • The Lakes Culture project will also form a supporting strand of the World Heritage Status bid to be submitted by the Lake District National Park and partners.

 ABOUT JAMES CROPPER & TECHNICAL FIBRE PRODUCTS (TFP):

James Cropper is based in the Lake District, England’s first and foremost National Park, with a paper-making heritage that started in 1845. Since its inception the business has been carefully stewarded and nurtured by six generations of the Cropper family.

Today the business is renowned globally for its luxury packaging papers, which accompany many of the world’s most exclusive brands, while the world’s leading artists, galleries and museums use its framing and archival boards alongside its range of conventional artists materials.  As well as paper products, James Cropper also manufactures nonwovens from carbon, glass and polymer fibres, which play a key part in production of composites in the automotive, energy and aerospace sectors.

Technical Fibre Products (TFP) is a leading nonwoven manufacturer, offering a broad range of high quality, technically advanced nonwovens which can be customised to meet specific application requirements. Established nearly 30 years ago, TFP primarily operates within the automotive, and aerospace composite markets while also providing effective solutions in the defence, energy, consumer electronics, industrial, construction and healthcare markets. Utilising extensive materials knowledge within polymers, particulates & speciality fibres together with high specification lamination, metal fibre coating and converting capabilities, TFP provide a wide range of customised solutions.

Published in European News

The launch exhibition for Manchester’s newly re-opened and revamped Whitworth art gallery caused a stampede of visitors, but few were to know that James Cropper’s paper lies at the heart of Cornelia Parker’s stunning War Room installation.

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Thousands of punched sheets of James Cropper’s custom-made, red poppy paper now hangs in the most unusual of places - the newly reopened Whitworth art gallery in Manchester. Usually sent for recycling, the vast sheets of paper left with poppy-shaped holes now feature at the heart of internationally renowned artist, Cornelia Parker’s solo exhibition.

A reported 18,000 people passed through the gallery’s doors on its opening weekend, reacting to the international media attention gained by the opening. Many of these visitors took their time to walk into War Room, the immersive installation that sees an entire room bedecked with paper reclaimed from the Aylesford poppy factory. Simply left with the poignant outline of the missing poppy, hung from floor to ceiling and overhead, Parker’s exceptionally well-received, emotionally charged tribute to fallen soldiers asks a literal question: where have all the flowers gone?

The poppy paper is made to exacting standards by James Cropper Paper, especially made to match the colour of the real flower and made to be rub and run resistant to protect clothing. The manufacturer supplies 250km of the paper to the Poppy Factory every year.

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The artist likens the intended experience of her installation to that of the op-artists of the 1960s, which saw the likes of Bridget Riley manipulate traditional art techniques to create optical illusions. A ‘walk-in’ piece, visitors are surrounded by with the industrial, rhythmic pattern pressed out of the paper. The breath-taking use of an otherwise wasted material has caused equal pride and intrigue amongst staff at the Cumbrian paper mill.

Phil Wild, CEO of James Cropper, comments: “James Cropper supplies the red poppy paper to the Royal British Legion, and support and respect the fantastic job that they do for past and present veterans and their families.  It is really interesting to see thought provoking art and narrative illuminating the effects of war. In re-using the remnants from poppy production to create War Room, Cornelia Parker poignantly reminds us of all the holes in our lives left behind by those who have been lost in conflict.

Cornelia Parker, famed for her use of found and overlooked materials, presents War Room as part of an exhibition of new commissions and retrospective installations at The Whitworth until Sunday 31 May 2015.

ABOUT JAMES CROPPER & TECHNICAL FIBRE PRODUCTS (TFP): 
James Cropper is based in the Lake District, England’s first and foremost National Park, with a paper-making heritage that started in 1845. Since its inception the business has been carefully stewarded and nurtured by six generations of the Cropper family.
Today the business is renowned globally for its luxury packaging papers, which accompany many of the world’s most exclusive brands, while the world’s leading artists, galleries and museums use its framing and archival boards alongside its range of conventional artists materials.  As well as paper products, James Cropper also manufactures nonwovens from carbon, glass and polymer fibres, which play a key part in production of composites in the automotive, energy and aerospace sectors.
Technical Fibre Products (TFP) is a leading nonwoven manufacturer, offering a broad range of high quality, technically advanced nonwovens which can be customised to meet specific application requirements. Established nearly 30 years ago, TFP primarily operates within the automotive, and aerospace composite markets while also providing effective solutions in the defence, energy, consumer electronics, industrial, construction and healthcare markets. Utilising extensive materials knowledge within polymers, particulates & speciality fibres together with high specification lamination, metal fibre coating and converting capabilities, TFP provide a wide range of customised solutions.
To find out more about the innovative production methods, product range, responsible manufacturing principles and history of James Cropper and Technical Fibre Products, please visit www.jamescropper.com and www.tfpglobal.com
Published in European News

3D printing has delivered spare parts to the International Space Station, concept cars and now delicious, personalised Valentine’s Day gifts. Few things can say ‘I love you’ like an image of your loved one perfectly printed in dark, milk and white chocolate, quite literally having the ability to make each other melt.

Chinese company, Wolfson have conquered the limitations of chocolate’s liquid tendencies to create a printer capable of producing fine images using nothing but the sweet stuff. This year they will be offering beautifully boxed, personalised portraits as gifts under the brand name ‘Euler’s Rose’.

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The company, founded by graduates of the University of Cambridge, returned to the UK in search of the ideal packaging for their innovative product, deciding on James Cropper’s Cocoa papers for the in-box wrapping – a paper itself produced by recycling the cocoa shells discarded during chocolate’s production.

Developed in collaboration with international cocoa trade supplier, Barry Callebaut and launched in 2013, Cocoa is part of James Cropper’s wide range of papers developed with sustainability-conscious customers front of mind. The ‘Cocoa Shell’ colour variant of the naturally pigmented stock for the chocolate photograph’s protective wrapper contrasts with the deep red tone of the outer box made of Colorplan Scarlet from G . F Smith.

The precarious science of printing with chocolate involves bringing the three shades of confectionery to temperatures between 34c and 38c, after which point they will become too runny to form an accurate image. Such devotion to honing this craft has been applauded by James Cropper.

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Chris Brown, Commercial Director, said: “It took James Cropper’s development team numerous trials to master the ability to incorporate cocoa shell powder into a paper that was ready for printing, food contact and it’s numerous other uses, but the perseverance paid off. We’re delighted that similarly tenacious and innovative entrepreneurs in China have found such a good use for the papers, and hope those who give and receive these gifts find a lifetime of happiness together.”

The luxurious gift box with gold foil print says ‘Euler’s Rose’ – a name drawn from a fable concerning two lovers, re-united over such a chocolate gift – and the great physicist, Albert Einstein’s famous quote: “Gravitation cannot be held responsible for people falling in love.”

ABOUT JAMES CROPPER & TECHNICAL FIBRE PRODUCTS (TFP): 
James Cropper is based in the Lake District, England’s first and foremost National Park, with a paper-making heritage that started in 1845. Since its inception the business has been carefully stewarded and nurtured by six generations of the Cropper family.
Today the business is renowned globally for its luxury packaging papers, which accompany many of the world’s most exclusive brands, while the world’s leading artists, galleries and museums use its framing and archival boards alongside its range of conventional artists materials.  As well as paper products, James Cropper also manufactures nonwovens from carbon, glass and polymer fibres, which play a key part in production of composites in the automotive, energy and aerospace sectors.
Technical Fibre Products (TFP) is a leading nonwoven manufacturer, offering a broad range of high quality, technically advanced nonwovens which can be customised to meet specific application requirements. Established nearly 30 years ago, TFP primarily operates within the automotive, and aerospace composite markets while also providing effective solutions in the defence, energy, consumer electronics, industrial, construction and healthcare markets. Utilising extensive materials knowledge within polymers, particulates & speciality fibres together with high specification lamination, metal fibre coating and converting capabilities, TFP provide a wide range of customised solutions.
To find out more about the innovative production methods, product range, responsible manufacturing principles and history of James Cropper and Technical Fibre Products, please visit www.jamescropper.com and www.tfpglobal.com

Julie Tomlinson
E: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
T: +44 1539 818413

Published in European News

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A stylish bar, fit for a lavish cocktail party before being recycled, has been produced by British design studio, Flow Creation using luxury papers from British manufacturer, James Cropper

2015-01-14 083615170 year-old paper innovators, James Cropper and heritage clothing brand, Thomas Pink joined forces to commission a stunning paper bar and set of paper drinking accessories, designed to stand as a centrepiece in the hallowed halls of London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) during the London Collections fashion event.

Developed and built by Sam Robins of design studio, Flow Creation, the free-standing bar, made from two different weights of James Cropper’s White Kendal Manilla stock came complete with paper glasses, lamps and fine architectural detail to complement the historic setting. Constructed to stand at the heart of Thomas Pink’s, London-inspired Autumn/Winter 2015 collection launch on Saturday 10 January 2015, the collaboration called on the designer to evoke the crisp freshness of a new, white shirt while testing the qualities of the versatile paper stock.

Following deliveries of 315gsm and 180gsm papers to his Blackpool studio, Robins combined manual hand-working and paper cut techniques with computerised design and cutting processes to develop the bar and drinking paraphernalia. As well as working with Thomas Pink’s commercial team and both event and lighting designers for his cues, he looked to the ICA itself for inspiration, noting detail from the Corinthian columns and ornate cornicing.

Sam says:“Initially I was shocked by the size of the venue; it’s a really grand, imposing space. The bar has grown to 8.5 metres long as a result. Thomas Pink really let me develop the design and specifications with little intervention, simply asking that it did the job of allowing models to interact with it as an alternative to your usual catwalk fashion show. The paper has stood up to every test I have thrown at it, with heavier stock taking the burden of structural support and the lighter weight allowing for decorative elements. Many of the props are really quite large, but can stand without additional support.”

2015-01-14 083706As well as creating lemon slices, martini glasses and even a paper-framed, 3D artwork of the Thomas Pink logo, ‘cheeky fox’, Robins has incorporated LEDs and RGB lighting tape into hidden parts of the bar to ensure it responds to thematic changes during the show. The only structural concession required of the paper, to give models confidence in using the bar naturally, was an MDF sub-structure for surface strength and ballast. To close the event, gathered VIPs of the fashion industry and press were handed pink pens and invited to leave messages on the clean, white surface.

Chris Brown, Commercial Director of James Cropper, said:Our customers come to us for a product that is perfectly matched to their needs, and in this case our White Kendal Manilla was ideal for laser cutting as well as the purity of its colour. Kendal Manilla has become established as a benchmark in quality in the art, craft and stationery markets and has proved perfect for the intricate construction of this fun, visually stunning project.”

The paper bar will be recycled following the press launch alongside the PINK Drink/James Cropper branded paper drinks cups used to serve cocktails at the event.  The Kendal Manilla stock contains up to 40% reclaimed fibres from single-use drinks cups.  The reclaimed pulp originates from James Cropper’s own, pioneering recycling plant, which sees the formerly unrecyclable waste material given a new lease of life.

ABOUT JAMES CROPPER & TECHNICAL FIBRE PRODUCTS (TFP):

James Cropper is based in the Lake District, England’s first and foremost National Park, with a paper-making heritage that started in 1845. Since its inception the business has been carefully stewarded and nurtured by six generations of the Cropper family.

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Today the business is renowned globally for its luxury packaging papers, which accompany many of the world’s most exclusive brands, while the world’s leading artists, galleries and museums use its framing and archival boards alongside its range of conventional artists materials.  As well as paper products, James Cropper also manufactures nonwovens from carbon, glass and polymer fibres, which play a key part in production of composites in the automotive, energy and aerospace sectors.

Technical Fibre Products (TFP) is a leading nonwoven manufacturer, offering a broad range of high quality, technically advanced nonwovens which can be customised to meet specific application requirements. Established nearly 30 years ago, TFP primarily operates within the automotive, and aerospace composite markets while also providing effective solutions in the defence, energy, consumer electronics, industrial, construction and healthcare markets. Utilising extensive materials knowledge within polymers, particulates & speciality fibres together with high specification lamination, metal fibre coating and converting capabilities, TFP provide a wide range of customised solutions.

To find out more about the innovative production methods, product range, responsible manufacturing principles and history of James Cropper and Technical Fibre Products, please visit www.jamescropper.com and www.tfpglobal.com

Published in European News

Croxley Heritage Re-launched in 2015

Prestigious British paper brand returns with a mission to reignite the romance in quality stationery.

One of the great British stationery brands Croxley Heritage is to be reintroduced to the desks of discerning business and private paper buyers via a relaunch at Paperworld, Frankfurt between Saturday 31 January – Tuesday 3 February 2015. Inspired by the original brands of John Dickinson & Co. Ltd of London, established in 1804, the stationery line will be reactivated by luxury paper manufacturer, James Cropper.

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Inventor of continuous mechanised paper production techniques, John Dickinson (1782-1869) established mills across the world at the height of his powers as a leading, Victorian industrialist. However, it was his mill at Croxley Green, Hertfordshire on the banks of the Grand Union canal that gave some of the famous Dickinson brands - including Croxley – their names, with paper running off the production line there for 150 years until 1980.

Having been recently acquired by James Cropper – based in Cumbria at the heart of England’s Lake District – 2015 sees Croxley Heritage re-launched to carry the values and traditions of one of the world’s oldest and most sought after paper products, with the brand’s custodians encouraging buyers to rediscover the romance of beautifully made, traditional stationery.

Chris Brown, Commercial Director of James Cropper, said: “Croxley Heritage is a name synonymous with the best traditions of British paper manufacturing, born of a pioneering paper maker, John Dickinson. Like Dickinson, James Cropper - great-great-great grandfather of our Chairman Mark Cropper – believed in the production of only the highest quality papers.  It is fitting that we have the opportunity to take this brand back onto the market in the best of their founding traditions.”

The paper fibre used to make the contemporary versions of Croxley Heritage will be comprised of 90% post-consumer waste and 10% reclaimed cup fibre from James Cropper’s own reclaimed fibre facility, opened last year following a £5million investment. The production process uses Hydro Power from a newly commissioned hydro plant on the river Kent (developed with Ellergreen Energy); ensuring Croxley Heritage is as clean to produce as it appears in its final form.  Croxley Heritage is a watermarked paper range in a neutral colour palette – white, cream, silver, wedgwood – available in a selection of wove, laid and linen finishes. 

Phil Wild, CEO of James Cropper, said: “Business users looking for a paper to reflect their credentials will find the Croxley Heritage range perfect for letterheads, business cards and other uses, but we also recognise that sustainable sourcing is also a reputational issue for all of our customers. The production process has been carefully designed to ensure the environmental impact of every sheet of paper is dramatically reduced by using state-of-the-art recycling technologies and sustainable energy procurement.”

ABOUT JAMES CROPPER & TECHNICAL FIBRE PRODUCTS (TFP):

James Cropper is based in the Lake District, England’s first and foremost National Park, with a paper-making heritage that started in 1845. Since its inception the business has been carefully stewarded and nurtured by six generations of the Cropper family.

Today the business is renowned globally for its luxury packaging papers, which accompany many of the world’s most exclusive brands, while the world’s leading artists, galleries and museums use its framing and archival boards alongside its range of conventional artists materials.  As well as paper products, James Cropper also manufactures nonwovens from carbon, glass and polymer fibres, which play a key part in production of composites in the automotive, energy and aerospace sectors.

Technical Fibre Products (TFP) is a leading nonwoven manufacturer, offering a broad range of high quality, technically advanced nonwovens into the composites market, which can be customised to meet specific application requirements. Established nearly 30 years ago, TFP primarily operates within the automotive, and aerospace composite markets while also providing effective solutions in the defence, energy, consumer electronics, industrial, construction and healthcare markets. Utilising extensive materials knowledge within polymers, particulates & speciality fibres together with high specification lamination, metal fibre coating and converting capabilities, TFP provide a wide range of customised solutions.

To find out more about the innovative production methods, product range, responsible manufacturing principles and history of James Cropper and Technical Fibre Products, please visit www.jamescropper.com and www.tfpglobal.com

Published in European News
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