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Hardwood pulp manufacturers in Europe have some of the highest wood fiber costs in the world despite prices for hardwood pulplogs having trended downward in most key markets on the continent over the past six years. In the second half of 2017, this trend reversed, with fiber prices going up in both the local currencies and in US dollar terms. In the 4Q/17, prices for hardwood logs in Spain and Finland were the highest on the continent, while French and Swedish prices were on the lower end of the hardwood cost spectrum, according to the Wood Resource Quarterly. 

Hardwood fiber supply in Sweden tightened in late 2017 because of an unusually wet and mild early winter season. The tight supply resulted in odd importations of Eucalyptus chips from both Brazil and Uruguay in late 2017 and early 2018 at prices reported to be that was substantially higher than those for domestically sourced wood fiber. The limited availability of logs resulted in higher prices for hardwood pulplogs during most of 2017 ( after being at an 11-year low in the 4Q/16). Despite the recent price rise in the 4Q/17, birch pulplog costs were about 15% lower than their 10-year average (in US dollar terms).

Prices for softwood chips and pulplogs were also up in Sweden during 2017 because of an imbalance between domestic supply and demand. The higher domestic fiber prices resulted in an increase in importation of softwood chip to Sweden in 2017, which reached almost double the volume imported five years ago. In the last quarter of the year, imports reached the  second highest quarterly volume on record. 

Historically, most imported chips have been destined for the country’s pulpmills, but over the past two years there has been an increase in imported chips to be used for energy. Latvia, Norway, Estonia and Finland, in ranking order, are the major suppliers of softwood chips, accounting for 95% of the total import volume in 2017. With a higher percentage of lower-cost energy chips over the past few years (predominantly from Norway), the average value for imported chips has declined by about 40% 2013 to 2017, according to the WRQ in its 4Q/17 issue. Of the four major supplying countries, Finland supplied the highest cost chips, while Norway was the lowest cost supplier in 2017.

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Modest increases in wood fiber costs and a substantial rise in market pulp prices have improved profitability for many market pulp manufacturers worldwide during the second half of 2017, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly

Pulp manufacturers in many countries have seen their wood fiber costs go up during 2017, with the biggest increases in US dollar terms occurring in Western North America, Europe, Russia and Australia, according to the Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ). The Global Softwood Fiber Price Index(SFPI) increased for the third consecutive quarter to reach $89.08/odmt in the 4Q/17, 4.0% higher than in the same quarter in 2016.

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Hardwood fiber prices have also trended upwards over the past year, with the Global Hardwood Fiber Price Index(HFPI) reaching its highest level in almost three years during the 4Q/17. In US dollar terms, hardwood fiber prices have gone up the most in Europe, Russia and Indonesia during 2017. The only region that has experienced a decline in wood fiber costs has been the US South, where hardwood pulplog prices were 2.3 % lower in the 4Q/17 than in the 4Q/16.

Wood fiber costs remain the single largest cost component in the manufacture of wood pulp, ranging between 40-60% of the total cash costs, depending on region and pulp grade. The wood fiber costs as a percentage of the price of Northern Bleached Softwood Kraft market pulp (NBSK) have been on a downward trajectory over the past eight years.

The substantial increases in market pulp prices during the 4Q/17 and only small upward price adjustments of pulpwood resulted in the wood fiber cost percentage reaching a record low of 23.2% in the last quarter of 2017 (down from 36% in 2012). Since wood fiber costs account for a majority of the pulp manufacturing costs, the low wood cost share has improved profitability for market pulp manufacturers throughout the world during 2017.

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    Global lumber, sawlog and pulpwood market reporting is included in the 56-page quarterly publication Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ). The report, which was established in 1988 and has subscribers in over 30 countries, tracks sawlog, pulpwood, wood chip, lumber and pellet prices, trade and market developments in most key regions around the world. To subscribe to the WRQ, please go to www.woodprices.com

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    Wood Resources International LLC
    Hakan Ekstrom
    Seattle, USA
    info@woodprices.com
    www.woodprices.com

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Wood raw-material costs for European pulpmills continued to slide in early 2017 to reach their lowest levels in over five years, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly

pulpwoodThe European pulp industry has become much more competitive in the international pulp and paper market the past five years with wood fiber costs, which account for 55-65% of the production costs, having fallen more than in most other regions of the world, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly. Some of the  biggest price declines have been for hardwood pulplogs in the Nordic countries.

Wood costs for the pulp industry in Europe were generally lower in the 1Q/17 than in the previous quarter, continuing a downward trend that, depending on the country, has lasted for 4-6 years. The biggest price declines for pulplogs and sawmill residues in early 2017 occurred in Germany and France, according to the Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ). The price reductions occurred mainly because of an oversupply of pulplogs, unchanged demand for wood fiber from the pulp industry, and reduced usage of raw-material by the competing wood pellet sector.

In neighboring Austria, conifer pulplog prices have been very stable during most of 2015 and 2016 (in Euro terms) and prices did not change much in the 1Q/17. However, the weakening of the Euro against the US dollar has resulted in Austrian pulplog prices falling seven percent in two years.

In the Nordic countries, wood fiber costs in the 1Q/17 were at their lowest levels since 2006 (in US dollars). This was mostly thanks to the weakening of the local currencies in both Sweden and Finland. The wood fiber costs currently account for about 60% of the manufacturing cost when manufacturing pulp in the region, according to Fisher International, so a reduction in prices for pulplogs and wood chips has a major impact in improving the competitiveness of the pulp and paper industry when competing in the global market place.

The pulp sectors in Portugal and Spain, which are the third and fourth largest consumers of hardwood logs in Europe, have also enjoyed a period of declining wood costs with the price levels in early 2017 being 20-25% below the fiber costs five years ago.

Hardwood fiber costs for pulpmill in Europe have fallen more rapidly than in other parts of the world from 2012 to 2017, and the industry has become much more competitive with competitors in North America, Latin America and Asia, according to the WRQ. For example, the price discrepancy for hardwood pulplogs between Sweden and the US South has fallen from US$62/odmt in the 1Q/12 to only US$9/odmt in the 1Q/17.

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Wood fiber costs for pulpmills throughout the US fell during 2016 and early 2017 with the price discrepancy between the Northwest and the Southern states narrowing, according to the North American Wood Fiber Review

2014 03 03 093023Wood fiber costs for pulpmills in the US Northwest have fallen faster than in other region of the US the past year, resulting in a more competitive industry sector, reports the North American Wood Fiber Review. Despite the recent price reductions in Washington and Oregon, pulp manufacturers in the southern states continued to have lower wood fiber costs than pulpmills in the Northwest, Northeast and the Lake States in the 1Q/17.

“Volatile” could best describe many of the North American regional market conditions in the first quarter of 2017! The volatility came in many different areas; adverse weather events, operation breakdowns, plant explosions, and idling, as well as uncertainties over looming trade policy decisions, according to the North American Wood Fiber Review (NAWFR). Wood flows across Canada and the U.S. northern tier of states as well as through the Pacific Northwest were impacted by weather–either too much snow (leading to transportation difficulties), or mild temperatures followed by early breakup.

The declining price trend for chips and pulplogs in the Northwest that occurred during 2015 and 2016 came to a halt in early 2017 because of uncertainty about fiber availability as a result of slowdowns in harvest operations. Over the past two years, fiber costs have declined by 13% in the Northwest and pulpmills in the region have become more competitive. In the 1Q/17, pulpmills had only slightly higher wood fiber costs than pulpmills in the historically low-cost US South. Pulpmills in the Lake States and the Northeastern states continue to have the highest wood costs in the US.

Wood fiber costs for pulpmills in the US South have also fallen over the past year, with average softwood pulplog prices being five percent lower in the 1Q/17 than in the 2Q/16. Prices for both softwood and hardwood pulplogs have slowly declined over the past four quarters to reach their lowest levels in three years.  With several planned pulpmill maintenance outages anticipated in the 2Q/17, fiber demand will remain muted in the coming months. Increased lumber production across the South will continue to generate additional volumes of residual chips resulting in downward price pressure on both chips and pulplogs in late spring and summer. For updated information on the 2Q/17 wood fiber prices and market developments in the US and Canada, please refer to the upcoming issue of the NAWFR.

The North American Wood Fiber Review (NAWFR) has tracked wood fiber markets in the US and Canada for over 30 years and it is the only publication that includes prices for sawlogs, pulpwood, wood chips and biomass in North America.  The 36-page quarterly report includes wood market updates for 15 regions on the continent in addition to the latest export statistics for sawlogs, lumber, wood pellets and wood chips.

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Low wood fiber costs in Brazil have continued to attract investments in pulp production capacity leading to substantial increases in market pulp exports in 2016, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly

Brazil’s pulp sector has for over two decades had some of the lowest wood fiber costs in the world, making the industry highly competitive, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly. The low production costs have resulted in major investments in pulp production capacity with a majority of the pulp being exported overseas, predominantly to China.

The export market for pulp produced in Brazil has become increasingly important for the pulp sector with the export share of domestic production having gone up from 55% in 2007 to almost 70% in 2016. Pulp export volumes have expanded in an impressive fashion over the past two decades, with increased year-over-year shipments for 19 of the past 20 years. This trend continued in 2016, with export volumes likely to reach almost 13 million tons, an increase of about 11% from 2015, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly.

Not surprisingly, China’s steady increase in demand for pulp the past decade has been the key driver to Brazil’s pulp export success story. Over one-third of Brazil’s exports were destined for China this year, up from 23% five years ago.

Brazil has become the second largest producer of wood-based pulp in the world behind the US, having surpassed Canada in 2016. The driving factors have been a combination of low wood fiber costs, a dramatically weakening Brazilian Real, and a steady increase in demand in particular for hardwood market pulp in China.

Over the past three years, wood fiber costs in Brazil have been approximately 60% of the manufacturing costs, according to Fisher International. The high cost share for wood fiber, together with being one the lowest-cost pulpwood regions of the world, has made Brazil’s pulp industry a very competitive pulp producer for many of the past 25 years.

In US dollar terms, Eucalyptus pulplog prices have fallen from a record-high in the 3Q/11 to a 12-year low in the 4Q/15. Since the end of 2015, wood fiber prices have gone up but are still substantially below their ten-year average, as reported by the WRQ (www.woodprices.com).

The past two decades have not only been mostly good news for the pulp industry in Brazil, but also for timberland owners measuring their financial results in the Brazilian Real (BRL). In 2016, eucalyptus pulplog prices reached their highest level on record since WRQ started tracking pulplog prices in Brazil over 20 years ago. Current prices are about five percent higher than one year ago in the local currency, and 23% above the average price two years ago.

Global lumber, sawlog, and pulpwood market reporting is included in the 52-page quarterly publication Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ). The report, which was established in 1988 and has subscribers in over 30 countries, tracks sawlog, pulpwood, wood chip, lumber and pellet prices, trade, and market developments in most key regions around the world. To subscribe to the WRQ, please go to www.woodprices.com

Contact Information
Wood Resources International LLC Hakan Ekstrom
Seattle, USA
info@woodprices.com 
www.woodprices.com
Published in South American News

After reaching a record high in 2014, log trade in the Baltic Sea fell by 10% in 2015. Most of the decline was that of softwood pulplogs, while trade of sawlogs actually increased to reach its highest level since 2007, according to the Wood Resource Quarterly. Russia has been surpassed by the Baltic States as the major softwood log supply region.

2014 03 03 093023The forest industry in the Baltic Sea region has for many decades imported large volumes of wood raw-material from their neighboring countries as a complement to their typically less costly local wood sources. For example, pulp mills in Finland and Sweden imported approximately 18% and 15%, respectively, of their wood fiber needs in 2014.

The log market in the Baltic Sea is one of the most active markets in the world with softwood log trade accounting for over 20% of global trade, and shipments of hardwood logs reaching almost 29% of world trade of temperate hardwoods in 2015. Finland and Sweden are the major importing countries, but forest companies in Germany and Poland have also been importing substantial log volumes over the past five years.

In 2014, total log trade to the Nordic countries reached a six-year high of 14.3 million m3 after five years of consecutive increases. In 2015, total shipments fell over 10% mainly because of lower demand for softwood pulplogs, according to the Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ). Trade of softwood sawlogs on the other hand, reached its highest level since 2007 last year when 1.6 million m3 was imported primarily to sawmills in Sweden.

The major log trade flows in Northern Europe the past few years have been:

•   Norway to Sweden (softwood)
•   Latvia to Sweden (softwood and hardwood)
•   Russia to Finland (softwood and hardwood)
•   Estonia to Sweden (hardwood)

Ten years ago, Russia exported about 7.5 million m3 of softwood logs to the Nordic countries but after the introduction of the country’s log export duties, shipments plunged, and over the past three years, volumes have been just over one million m3 annually. With the fall of Russian log exports, log exporters in the Baltic States stepped in and the region became the major log supplier of logs to sawmills and pulp mills in the Nordic countries and Germany. However, over the past four years, shipments of softwood logs have been in steady decline from 3.1 million m3 in 2011 to only approximately 1.3 million m3 in 2015, as reported in the WRQ.

It is interesting to note that during the same period, exports of hardwood logs from the Baltic States have fallen almost 30%, while Russia has become a more aggressive player as the weak Ruble has made Russian logs more competitive.

Global lumber, sawlog and pulpwood market reporting is included in the 52-page quarterly publication Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ). The report, which was established in 1988 and has subscribers in over 30 countries, tracks sawlog, pulpwood, lumber and pellet prices, trade and market developments in most key regions around the world. To subscribe to the WRQ, please go to www.woodprices.com
 
Contact Information
Wood Resources International LLC Hakan Ekstrom
Seattle, USA
info@wri-ltd.com
www.woodprices.com

Published in financial News

Log arrivals to China surged in March with an increase of 76% over the previous month. This came after almost a year of declining log imports, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly. New Zealand and Australia increased their volumes the most, together accounting for a record-high share of over 50% of the total import volume. Log import prices have trended downward since early 2014 and were in March 15% below the price a year ago.

2015 05 13 071012Log import volumes to China typically increase in the month of March every year and 2015 was no exception with a 76 percent jump from the previous month. The softwood log imports reached 2.9 million m3. This is the highest monthly volume since early in 2014, and incidentally, is also higher than the monthly average over the past two years, as reported in the upcoming issue of the Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ).

With the Russian ruble falling in value by over 50% over the past six months, there were expectations by some market observers that Russian exporters would increase their export volumes substantially in 2015, but that has not yet happened. In the first quarter of 2015, Russia actually exported fewer softwood logs to China than in the previous quarter, and comparitively, shipments were almost 15% below the 1Q/2014.

As indicated in the latest issue of the WRQ, there are numerous obstacles to Russian log exporters increasing export volumes in the short-term. These include inadequate ability to promptly increase timber harvests when opportunities arise, limited access to logging equipment, insufficient infrastructure, lack of loggers and truckers, and logistical bottle necks in the entire supply chain from the forests to the ports. As a consequence, many logging companies and sawmills have had difficulty taking advantage of the improved export market opportunities so far.

Rather than a surge in softwood logs from Russia entering the Chinese market, log exporters in New Zealand and Australia increased their shipments by 250% and 165%, respectively from February to March. Combined, the two countries supplied over 50% of Chinese log imports in March, a record high share for the Oceanian log exporters.

While log import volumes to China surged in March, prices did not. The average import price was actually at the lowest level since 2010. Prices for imported softwood logs have trended downward for almost a year and were in March of this year 15% lower than in March of 2014. North American logs have the highest costs, while Australia and New Zealand are on the lower end of the cost scale.

Global lumber, sawlog and pulpwood market reporting is included in the 52-page quarterly publication Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ). The report, which was established in 1988 and has subscribers in over 30 countries, tracks sawlog, pulpwood, lumber and pellet prices, trade and market developments in most key regions around the world. To subscribe to the WRQ, please go to www.woodprices.com

Contact Information
Wood Resources International LLC
Hakan Ekstrom
Seattle, USA
info@wri-ltd.com
www.woodprices.com
Published in financial News

Wood fiber costs for pulp mills in the Western US have increased substantially over the past year while other regions in the US have experienced only modest increases, according to the North American Wood Fiber Review

2015 04 27 092827Pulp mills in the US South continued to have stable wood fiber prices in the 1Q/15 at levels lower than any other region in the country. The dramatic increase in chip prices in the Northwest during 2014 started to level off early in 2015, while tight fiber supply in both the Lake State region and in the Northeast resulted in upward price pressure, reports the North American Wood Fiber Review.

Wood fiber costs for pulp mills in the US South were substantially lower than the costs for pulp companies in the rest of the US in the 1Q/15. Prices for softwood residual chips in the Southern states were over 30 percent lower than in the Northeast, Lake States and the Northwest, according the latest issue of the North American Wood Fiber Review (NAWFR).

Pulplog and wood chip prices have held steady in the South for the past 12 months at prices nearing 10-year highs. Sufficient supply of pulplogs and residual chips and steady production levels at the region’s pulp mills have contributed to a healthy fiber supply and demand balance. 

With pulpmills generally able to build healthy wood inventories in the 1Q/15 and with a number of maintenance outages scheduled for the second quarter, the stage is set for a possible reduction in pulpwood pricing in some southern states in the near future.

Heavy snowfalls across the Northeast, excluding the northern half of Maine, have created challenges for forest access and transportation during the 1Q/15. Fiber inventories, particularly those of hardwood, remained short resulting in concerns over having sufficient supplies on hand to carry through the spring, when road weight limitations and mud season greatly diminish harvest levels. Pulplog prices in this region were slightly higher in the 1Q/15 as compared the previous quarter.

Prices for both logs and chips in the Lake States were up to record high levels as obtaining adequate fiber supplies remained a serious challenge in the 1Q/15. Prices remained high despite the reasonable snow levels and standard temperatures.

In the 1Q/15, wood chip prices in the US Northwest continued their upward trend that started in late 2013, reaching their highest levels in almost three years. In only the past 12 months, softwood chips prices have gone up 21 percent. With the recent increases, this region had some of the highest wood chip prices in North America, reports the NAWFR (www.woodprices.com). With additional residual chips generated by increased lumber production in the coming months, it is likely that chip prices will decline later in 2015.

The North American Wood Fiber Review has tracked wood fiber markets in the US and Canada for over 20 years and it is the only publication that includes prices for sawlogs, pulpwood, wood chips and biomass in North America. The 36-page quarterly report includes wood market updates for 15 regions on the continent in addition to the latest export statistics for sawlogs, wood pellets and wood chips.

Contact Information

Wood Resources International LLC

Hakan Ekstrom

Seattle, USA

info@wri-ltd.com

www.woodprices.com

Published in financial News

Reduced pulpwood prices in Sweden, Russia, Brazil and Australia in the 3Q/14 resulted in the lowest Hardwood Fiber Price Index (HFPI) since 2009, according to the Wood Resource Quarterly. With mixed price trends for softwood fiber, the Softwood Fiber Price Index (SFPI) has been fairly stable the past two years.

pulpwoodThe costs of hardwood fiber for the manufacturing of pulp have trended downward for over three years. The global Hardwood Fiber Price Index (HFPI), which tracks prices for pulplogs and wood chips in 14 regions around the world, reached its lowest level since 2009 in the 3Q/14 when it fell to $96.76 per oven-dry metric ton (odmt). The biggest declines in prices from the 2Q/14 occurred in Sweden, Russia, Brazil and Australia mainly as the result of a stronger US dollar.

The HFPI index has trended downward for over three years when the all-time high of $117.90/odmt was reached. The largest consumption of hardwood fiber in the world is in Brazil where the pulp production has been on an upward trend for over two decades.

Despite the continued increase in pulp production and the accompanying rise in wood fiber consumption, prices for Eucalyptus logs have not changed much in Brazilian Real terms, according to the Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ). In US dollar terms the picture is somewhat different, with prices having fallen as the Brazilian Real has depreciated.

The Softwood Fiber Price Index (SFPI), which tracks global prices of softwood chips and pulplogs, has been fairly steady over the past two years, fluctuating between $98-100/odmt. The major changes in softwood prices in 2014 occurred in sawmill residuals in Western US and Western Canada where prices increased, and in Germany and Brazil where prices have fallen this year.

In Western Canada, chip prices have gone up mainly because of higher prices for softwood market pulp (NBSK), to which they often are linked, while recent price increases in Western US have been driven by a rise in the volume of exported chips to Japan.

Although wood raw-material costs for the Russian forest industry have not changed much in Ruble terms, the costs in US dollars for pulplogs have fallen dramatically from the 2Q to the 3Q this year because of the weakening Russian currency. Pulpwood prices have come down to levels not seen in more than six years. Currently, both softwood and hardwood pulplog prices are lower in Russia than in any of the 17 other regions covered by the WRQ (www.woodprices.com).

Global pulpwood and timber market reporting is included in the 52-page quarterly publication Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ). The report, which was established in 1988 and has subscribers in over 30 countries, tracks sawlog, pulpwood, lumber and pellet prices, trade and market developments in most key regions around the world. To subscribe to the WRQ, please go to www.woodprices.com

Wood Resources International LLC (WRI), an internationally recognized forest industry-consulting firm established in 1987, publishes two quarterly timber price reports and have subscribers in over 30 countries. The Wood Resource Quarterly, established in 1988, is a 52-page market report and includes sawlog prices, pulpwood and wood chip price and market commentary to developments in global timber, biomass and forest industry. The other report, the North Americam Wood Fiber Review, tracks prices of sawlogs, pulpwood, wood chips and biomass in most regions of Canada and the US.

Wood Resources International LLC
Hakan Ekstrom, +1 425-402-8809
info@wri-ltd.com
www.woodprices.com

Published in financial News

2014-03-03 093023Forest companies in Northern Europe have announced plans to investment three billion dollars in 2014 in attempt to move beyond mostly producing newsprint and commodity packaging grades. The idea is to diversify their product lines to include new bio-products from wood fiber and to generate bioenergy to reduce the region’s dependence on fossil fuels, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly.

The pulp and paper industry in the Nordic countries has started to see a new dawn with a growing demand for pulp and paper products made from long wood fiber from the vast conifer forests in Northern Europe. Just over the past few months, there have been a number of announcements in investments made by forest companies in Finland, Norway and Sweden totaling close to three billion dollars, as reported in the Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ).

The primarily end-products will be softwood market pulp and virgin fiber-based container board, but major investments are also being consider in increasing the utilization of forest biomass for energy on a larger scale. Although the investment decisions have not been finalized for all projects, these ruminations are a sign that the forest industry in this part of the world sees the future in a much brighter light than just a few years ago.

In addition to the investments in the pulp and paper industry, there has also been an announcement that the Swedish forest owner federation Sodra, together with the Norwegian energy company Statkraft, Europe’s largest producer of renewable energy, intends to establish an biofuel conglomerate at the site of the now closed pulpmill in Tofte, just south of the capital Oslo.

In Finland, Metsä Fiber has plans to invest 1.5 billion dollars in a plant that will produce softwood pulp, renewable bioenergy and what the company categorizes as “various bio-materials”.

Some of the factors that have placed softwood fiber in a new positive light are: limited investments in the establishments of softwood plantations worldwide, favorable global supply/demand balance for softwood pulp over hardwood pulp, (if you are a pulp manufacturer), increased demand for packaging material requiring wood fiber with high strength, and a rise in research in new products made from trees, sometimes as substitutes to non-renewable materials such as plastic and metal.

These recent developments in the Nordic countries may very well be the beginning of the biggest transformation of the softwood fiber-based forest industry we have seen in decades, not only in Northern Europe but in other regions of the world as well where coniferous forests is the dominant forest-type.

Global pulpwood and timber market reporting is included in the 52-page quarterly publication Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ). The report, which was established in 1988 and has subscribers in over 30 countries, tracks sawlog, pulpwood, lumber and pellet prices, trade and market developments in most key regions around the world. To subscribe to the WRQ, please go to www.woodprices.com

Additional Info

  • About

    Wood Resources International LLC (WRI), an internationally recognized forest industry-consulting firm established in 1987, publishes two quarterly timber price reports and have subscribers in over 30 countries. The Wood Resource Quarterly, established in 1988, is a 52-page market report and includes sawlog prices, pulpwood and wood chip price and market commentary to developments in global timber, biomass and forest industry. The other report, the North Americam Wood Fiber Review, tracks prices of sawlogs, pulpwood, wood chips and biomass in most regions of Canada and the US.

  • Contacts

    Wood Resources International LLC
    Hakan Ekstrom
    +1 425 402 8809
    info@wri-ltd.com
    www.woodprices.com

Published in European News
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